⇒ Skip this, take me to the discussion archive!

In 1999, we started Streetplay… and the discussion area quickly became its most popular feature.  While we’re carrying on our tradition of discussion 21st-century style on our Facebook Streetplay Discussion Group, we really didn’t want to lose all the years of reader-submitted stories and questions when we closed the discussions on Streetplay.com.  That’s why we’ve gathered together every non-spam message we could (our site was getting hacked left-and-right!), and gathered it all here in a new, WordPress-powered archive.

Nearly every message that was on our original discussion board can be found here.  Each message is created as a blog post, and when possible, the original author is credited.  Also, with the power of the WordPress platform, we’ve been able to group the messages by their original categories (see the menu system at the top of the page), and also add new tags to the nearly 4000 posts we’ve retrieved… take a look at the list of tags on the right-hand side, or just look for them at the bottom of any post.  Of course, you can also search for any specific words you want using the search function at the top of any page.

To get you started, we’ve inserted the first bit of the message list below, beginning with the most recent.  If any message strikes your fancy, try clicking its title, or use the categories and tags to dive deep into a topic you like.

Have fun with this!  We hope you enjoy exploring this unearthed corner of Streetplay as much as we do!


[no title]

To be able to play on Andrews Avenue (West Bronx) each player had to be able to hit a minimum of a sewer. Two Sewers and you were a Strong hitter. Ron & myself were Three sewer hitters making us the Home Run Kings. On rare occasions you hit both Three sweres & over the Six(6) story building. Rules were as previously mentioned – Down The Line – Right car was First – Second was Middle Sewer- Left car was Third. Lived for THIS game – Also same game without Bat was Punchball.

Posted in Bronx, Punchball, Stickball | Comments Off on [no title]

I was thinking of the games…

I was thinking of the games we used to play with a Spaldeen. There were games for only one person up through a full baseball team. As I remember them they were: 1 Person Catch with yourself- throw the ball up and catch it. Practicing your pitching against a box on the wall Throwing the ball against the wall to see how high you could throw it. On the roof was the ultimate Throwing the ball off the wall (or stoop) and practicing your catching ability. 2 Persons Box Baseball Hit the penny. Stickball Catch American Handball, paddle ball, etc. Off the wall Stoopball 3 Persons Monkey in the middle Running Bases Salugi (?) or keep away Chinese handball Larger Groups Punchball Slapball I’m sure there are more. But for 25 cents, nothing could beat thatbeautiful pink ball with the word Spaulding stamped on it. We didn’t need our parents making schedules, driving us all over the place. Just us and a little ball, and we were in heaven for hours. Mark Podhorzer Now of Atlanta GA, but in my heart always from Brooklyn

Posted in Ace King Queen, Box Baseball, Brooklyn, Hit the penny / stick / etc., Other Games, Other Spaldeen games, Punchball, Spaldeen games, Stickball, Stoopball, Wallball / Off the Wall/Point | Tagged , , | Comments Off on I was thinking of the games…

We statred out using an…

We statred out using an old mop handle as our “stick,” but as we got older we would pool our money and go to the local lumber yard and buy a 32-34″ piece of closet pole and wrap the bottom with black sticky electric tape (before the pine tar era). We even graduated to an old beaten up tennis ball rather than a pinky.

Posted in Stickball | Tagged , | Comments Off on We statred out using an…

In our neighborhood (Boro…

In our neighborhood (Boro Park section of Brooklyn) street stickball was played “up the middle.” No pulling the ball beyond the street curbs or parked cars (which were in play). It was strickly an up the middle hit or an out. We played the “one bounce” version which allowwed tricks on the ball to increase the ball movement and give the defense an edge.

Posted in Brooklyn, Stickball | Comments Off on In our neighborhood (Boro…

Ken Edwards Brighton…

Ken Edwards Brighton Beach 50’s and 60’s. You would wake up in the morning and wait. Soon you would hear, “Hey Kenny, could you come out?” If your parents were up, you would say, “Ma, can I go out and play?” In about 20 minutes, you had about 10 to 20 friends trying to figure out what to do first. Sometimes it was stickball, sometimes dodgeball, sometimes it was skelly or chinese handball. If it was too early in the morning, water would be flying out of somebody’s window and they would yell, “can’t you kids play elsewhere, it is too early in the morning.” No matter what, you were with a group of friends. This lasted till your mother popped her head out of the window and yelled your name to come home. 4 October 1997

Posted in Ace King Queen, Other Spaldeen games, Skully, Stickball | Tagged , | Comments Off on Ken Edwards Brighton…

What about “Ace, King, Queen”,…

What about “Ace, King, Queen”, “Hit the Stick”, “Box Ball”,and the “Girl Games”.

Posted in Ace King Queen, Boxball, Hit the penny / stick / etc., Other Games, Other Spaldeen games | Comments Off on What about “Ace, King, Queen”,…

How about “Corner Ball”….

How about “Corner Ball”. A four corner intersection was the “field” creating a “diamond”. Needless to say, a Spaldeen was the ball of policy and proceedure. No catcher position was required. The “Batter” took the ball in hand and hit it off the curb. If he missed the curb or hit it foul, he was out. All other rules of stickball applied, (although I can honestly say i have never heard of a guy “roofing it” in curb ball). In the summer on Briggs Avenue, we’d play at least 10-12 games a day while a bunch of other guys would be playing stickball. Now that I think about it, I guess corner ball allowed us to make room for another game to be played simultaneously while you waited to get on the stickball “field”. Of course, at least 4 guys would be off on the side with a game of “Off the Point” going, but that’s a whole other game.

Posted in Curbball, Other Spaldeen games, Stickball, Wallball / Off the Wall/Point | Tagged , | Comments Off on How about “Corner Ball”….

Gottem,gottem,needem,gottem,gottem,gottem,needem,gottem…

Gottem,gottem,needem,gottem,gottem,gottem,needem,gottem

Posted in Other Games, Street Lifestyle | Tagged | Comments Off on Gottem,gottem,needem,gottem,gottem,gottem,needem,gottem…

I grew up on the Lower East…

I grew up on the Lower East side of Manhattan — or at least that was what WE called it. Now the section I grew up in is called “the East Village”. Sigh. Anyway, I remember three different ice cream trucks (Mr. Frostee; some other company I can’t remember; and then eventually, Good Humor) in the summer. I remember the “knish man” in the winter. He was a large, grungy-looking individual wrapped in about ten layers of clothing to withstand the cold he had to endure eight hours a day. When I saw the movie, “Fiddler On the Roof” years later, I remember thinking that Tevye looked just like the knish man! Funny how, as an adult, you think about things like where street vendors go to the bathroom and/or wash their hands. As a child, you couldn’t have cared less.

Posted in Food & Drink, Locales, Manhattan, Reader Stories | Tagged , , | Comments Off on I grew up on the Lower East…

Growing up in Queens, we…

Growing up in Queens, we would also play stoopball a lot, but we played it with a baseball theme. If the ball bounced in front of the first defender and he missed it, then it was a single; between the two guys – double; from the second guy to the row of cars – a triple; and in the street was a homerun (assuming he didn’t catch it while dodging a car). Hitting a “pointer” just meant that you had a great shot at getting a homer.[

Posted in Other Spaldeen games, Queens, Stoopball | Comments Off on Growing up in Queens, we…